Supplement to WOW! First Grade Materials (Orange Level)


Unit 1, Lesson 10: The Quick Creepy Crawl and
Unit 1, Lesson 11: Do Not Be Tricked

Unit 3, Lesson 17: Big and Strong
Unit 3, Lesson 18: Busy Body
Unit 3, Lesson 23: Germs, Germs, Germs
Unit 6, Lesson 35: Believe It or Not

Unit 1, Lesson 10: The Quick Creepy Crawl and
Unit 1, Lesson 11: Do Not Be Tricked

After teaching both of these lessons, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to help your students learn which safety helpers to contact for different problems.

Brainstorm with students and write a list of safety helpers in the community. Help the children think of each helper listed on Safety Helpers: Emergency Workers (form 1.1a) and Other Safety Helpers (form 1.1b). Click here to access form 1.1a, and click here to access form 1.1b. Explain the importance of each of these safety helpers. Discuss what types of problems a student might ask for help with from each helper. (If desired, invite various safety helpers in your community to visit the class and talk about his or her job.)

Distribute the two forms to each student. Have students lay the two pages side by side on their work surface. Distribute nine place markers (Cheerios, small disks) to each student (or have students mark with a crayon or pencil). Direct students to mark the correct picture on the sheets in response to each statement you make (below). Accept all reasonable answers as more than one helper may serve in a specific function. Likewise, encourage students to share other tasks and services a safety helper may perform (e.g., firefighters also help free people trapped in tight spaces, even if there is no fire; a trusted adult may help a child cross the street).


Unit 3, Lesson 17: Big and Strong

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to celebrate individual differences and challenge stereotypical beliefs.

Discuss how each of us is different, we are each special in our own ways. For example, say, Different children may grow at different speeds to different sizes than other children. Some of us have brown hair, and some of us have red hair (and so on). Some of us come from Hispanic (or Spanish) cultures, and some of us come from Asian, African, or European cultures (and so on). Some of us are boys (males) and some of us are girls (females). So, each of us is different from the others—not ‘wrong’ just different. That’s what makes us each special.

Unfortunately, though, too often people start to think someone should be a certain way because they are a girl or because they are from a certain culture or country or because they are taller or shorter than someone else. Is that fair? (No!) We’re going to play a little game to help us think about this problem of judging (deciding what they’re like or should do) someone without getting to know them first.

Distribute one set of precut game cards from the Chore Game Cards (form 1.2a) to each small group. Click here to access form 1.2a. Direct students to decide together which type of person should do the chores—girls or boys. Have students lay the cards for girls on one side of the work surface and the cards for boys on the other side. Allow groups to share their decisions and discuss. Gently discourage stereotypical responses and encourage creativity, such as boys and girls working together or boys doing traditionally female chores, and vice versa. Collect cards.

Distribute one set of precut game cards from the Food Game Cards (form 1.2b) to each small group. Click here to access form 1.2b. Direct students to decide together which type of person should eat the foods—girls or boys. Have students lay the cards for girls on one side of the work surface and the cards for boys on the other side. Allow groups to share their decisions and discuss. Collect cards.

Explain that while usually people don’t expect someone to eat or not eat a food because of their gender (a boy or a girl), they often have set ideas about what people might eat from different cultures. For example, they might believe that everyone from Mexico eats tacos, everyone from China eats rice, and everyone from America loves hamburgers. These beliefs are simply not true!

Discuss how each family has their own favorite foods based on their experiences, likes and dislikes, culture, and other reasons. People may eat similar foods even though they have different backgrounds and traditions while many may not like the foods they are growing up with. What we like to eat is special to each of us.

Gently challenge other stereotyping behavior and attitudes that may emerge in your classroom throughout the school year. This will promote self-acceptance for each child and inclusive behavior among all children.


Unit 3, Lesson 18: Busy Body

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to introduce your students to the life skill of setting goals for task completion. The handy parent involvement form included will help you find support on the home front as well.

Review the sidebar titled Be a Busy Body (p. 41 of student book). Remind students that being physically active and eating right helps keep a busy body healthy. Explain that to set a goal means to plan to do something. To reach a goal means you actually do what you said was your goal (or more). Tell students that goals that are written down are more likely to be reached.

Distribute My Busy Body Healthy Goals (form 1.3) to each student. Click here to access form 1.3. Read the form aloud to the class, explaining it as you read. Select students to suggest reasonable numbers to fill in the blanks. Discuss. Encourage everyone to challenge themselves while not setting impossible goals, which may lead to discouragement and less healthy behavior. Help each student complete his or her form, or have students set the goals at home with a parent or guardian.

Upon collecting the returned, signed goal sheets, celebrate what the children were able to do. Total up the number of physical activity sessions and then the number of healthy snacks the entire class collectively accomplished. Repeat this activity in the future, challenging students to beat the collective class totals.


Unit 3, Lesson 23: Germs, Germs, Germs

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to help your students learn to convey health information and ideas effectively. The peer teaching element both reinforces the learning and applies effective communication strategies to health topics.

Brainstorm and record a list of health topics with students. Help students think of both broad topics (e.g., good nutrition) and finer details (e.g., fruits, vegetables). Allow students to scan the entire text for ideas. Try to list at least 40 topics. Next, allow each student to choose one topic. You may need to have students each select three topics, then assign one to avoid conflict.

Provide materials such as books, Internet access or printouts, pamphlets, the WOW! text, learning games, videos, and the like to help students complete Our Class Learns About the World of Wellness (WOW!) (form 1.4). Click here to access form 1.4. Be sure to have students work with a partner or small group to complete step 3. Duplicate each completed page to make enough copies for each student to have their own completed book. Combine the pages to make copies of the class book.

Arrange for partners or small groups to visit other classrooms and share their learning by reading some of the pages aloud and answering peer questions. Reinforce positive communication attempts by having a publication party with healthy snacks.


Unit 6, Lesson 35: Believe It or Not

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to show your students how TV, computers, and video games affect personal health.

Ask students to guess how much time they spend altogether each day watching TV, playing video games, and on a computer. Explain that most people spend too much time using media—one word to describe all these activities. They should spend far more time being physically active and far less time sitting (school work aside). This change of habits will help each of them become and stay healthier.

Distribute Healthy Activities and Pictures for Healthy Activities to each student (forms 1.5a–b). Click here to access form 1.5a. Click here to access form 1.5b. Discuss the pictures found on form 1.5b—more healthy versus less healthy. Direct students to cut apart the pictures. To check for understanding, have them glue each picture into the column on form 1.5a that they believe it fits best in. Once all students have completed the activity, review understanding by quickly reminding students which activities belong in each column. On a blank sheet of paper, ask students to draw a picture of themselves participating in a physical activity. Direct them to add a sentence describing the activity to the sheet.

Send home with students the parent involvement letter with Media Tickets (form 1.6). Click here to access form 1.6. Also verbally encourage students to use the Media Tickets to reduce the total time they spend using media and increase the total time they spend being physically active.