Supplement to WOW! Second Grade Materials (Yellow Level)


Unit 1, Lesson 3: Secret Safety Codes
Unit 1, Lesson 7: Heart Healthy and
Unit 1, Lesson 11: Don’t Be Tricked

Unit 1, Lesson 9: Family Fitness Fun
Unit 1, Lesson 10: The Quick Creepy Crawl and
Unit 6, Lesson 33: Taking Care of Each Other

Unit 1, Lesson 11: Don’t Be Tricked
Unit 2, Lesson 13: A Crunch for Lunch
Unit 2, Lesson 14: Tacos by Cody
Unit 2, Lesson 15: Go–Go–Go!
Unit 3, Lesson 22: I Had a Bug in My Throat
Unit 3, Lesson 23: Germs, Germs, Germs
Unit 4, Lesson 27: The Cheetah and the Antelope
Unit 5, Lesson 29: No Way!
Unit 5, Lesson 31: Yuck! and
Unit 5, Lesson 32: Some Things Are Not for Kids

Unit 6, Lesson 34: Only One Earth
Unit 6, Lesson 35: Believe It or Not

Unit 1, Lesson 3: Secret Safety Codes

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these WOW! Health Activities so that students may demonstrate knowledge of appropriate safety skills and equipment for recreational activities.

Divide the class into nine teams of 2-4 students. Assign each team one situation listed below. Direct teams to discuss, then act out safe ways to do these activities, including putting on any necessary safety equipment. Some suggestions are listed in parentheses.

For individual assessment, ask each student to draw an activity or a piece of safety equipment and tell why the activity is safe or how the equipment increases safety.


Unit 1, Lesson 7: Heart Healthy and Unit 1, Lesson 11: Don’t Be Tricked

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these WOW! Health Activities to help students describe and understand a wide range of behaviors and habits that may be dangerous at home and school, on the playground, and in the larger community.

After completing Unit 1, use this activity and worksheet to review safety issues. Offer a variety of situations for children to vote on—safe or unsafe. Have those voting safe stand up and those voting unsafe stay seated (or sit back down). Here are some ideas to help you get started; add ideas specific to your school and community:

Complete Yes or No? (form 2.1) as a group or have students work alone or in pairs. Review the correct answers to reinforce the learning. Click here to access form 2.1.

Technology connection (optional): Create a Safe Choices picture gallery by photographing students modeling safe behavior. Display on your school’s web site or in a high traffic area of the school or have your students explain the photos and teach the concepts to younger students.


Unit 1, Lesson 9: Family Fitness Fun

When teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to further explain the roles of safety personnel.

Explain that many times swimming lessons include information about first aid because injuries may happen around water. Define first aid as Emergency care for a victim of sudden illness or injury. You might also wish to add, This care is given until someone who is more skillful in providing medical care (such as a doctor) is available. Conduct the following discussion:

  1. Say First, numero uno, number one! Why is the ‘first’ in ‘first aid’? (It involves the first things you should do when someone is hurt while waiting for more help; it is help that gets there first.)
  2. Ask, Why is the ‘aid’ in ‘first aid’? (First aid gives help or assistance.)
  3. Put it back together: ‘First aid’ plus ‘kit’ gives us ‘first aid kit’, which is a collection of simple items to use if needed when giving first aid. Can you name some of the items that might be in a first aid kit? (Bandages, antibiotic cream, special tape.)
  4. Show (or have the school nurse show) the children a complete first aid kit. Discuss its contents and their uses, e.g., we would use a bandage if someone was bleeding from a fall. Emphasize that the kit is not a toy, but an important tool for helping someone who suddenly becomes sick or injured.
  5. Record student ideas about what might require first aid and what items might be of help. At the same time, help students remember ways to prevent accidents and injuries, e.g., by following playground rules. Post the list as a reminder to students.


Unit 1, Lesson 10: The Quick Creepy Crawl and Unit 6, Lesson 33: Taking Care of Each Other

With Unit 6, Lesson 33, use Community Helpers (form 2.2), which is a revised version of form 6.1 found in WOW! Health Education Teacher’s Guide: Yellow Level, now including poison control worker and crossing guard. Click here to access form 2.2.

After teaching these lessons, you may also wish to use Safety Helpers: What Do They Do? (form 2.3) to further reinforce learning and check for understanding to ensure students can explain the roles of safety personnel. Click here to access form 2.3.


Unit 1, Lesson 11: Don’t Be Tricked

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these WOW! Health Activities to help students identify some of the symptoms of poisoning and learn how to get help. The parent involvement aspect will not only reinforce the learning, it will also help further ensure all children are safe.

Make an overhead transparency of Poison! (form 2.4) and photocopy it, one per child. Click here to access form 2.4. Display the transparency and distribute one copy of the form to each child. Complete the form together as a class, defining and discussing each point made.

Distribute one copy of Nationwide Poison Control (form 2.5) to each child. Click here to access form 2.5. Encourage students to be sure they give this helpful information to a parent or guardian. Tell students that in the coming weeks, you will be asking them to report if they have practiced contacting poison control. If desired, ask parents and guardians to sign and return this form to verify the practice was completed.


Unit 2, Lesson 13: A Crunch for Lunch

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use this additional WOW! Health Activity to help students demonstrate proper food handling techniques.

Gather supplies to make two healthy apple and peanut butter snacks as a demonstration. You will also need surface, hand, and apple cleaning supplies and two clean and one (obviously) dirty table knife (e.g., previously smeared with a little peanut butter and allowed to dry). Have additional apples and supplies for student snacks.

Pull out one apple and one container of peanut butter to work on a table top all can see. Without comment, slice the apple without washing your hands or the table top. Hold up the dirty knife with a flourish, then cut the apple into quarters and spread it with peanut butter. Set this snack aside.

Now, continuing without comment, pull out a second apple, a second container of peanut butter, and the cleaning supplies. Clean the table top thoroughly. Wash your hands. Wash the apple. Make the second snack the same way as the first, but cut the apple with one clean knife and spread the peanut butter with the other clean knife.

Now ask students which snack they would like to eat and why. Be sure to bring out the importance of a clean work surface, clean hands, clean utensils, and cleaning the food. In addition, show the children the expiration dates on the peanut butter containers and explain how important it is to not eat food past its expiration date.

Now have pairs of students prepare their own apple snacks as you lead the class through appropriate food handling practices. (Note: For safety reasons, an adult should cut the apples.)

To check for understanding, have students complete Food: Handle With Care (form 2.6). Click here to access form 2.6.


Unit 2, Lesson 14: Tacos by Cody

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to have students work with a family member to plan a family meal.

Tell students they are going to have an opportunity to do what Cody did, at least the planning stage, to create a healthy meal for their families. Distribute one copy of form 2.7 to each student. Click here to access form 2.7. Review the components of a balanced meal. Emphasize that this assignment focuses on planning not cooking, but that if a responsible family member would also like to help the child also cook the meal, that is a nice bonus. Set a due date.

Once the menus are returned allow students to share their ideas in a small group or with a partner. Have students help each other respectfully make changes if needed to create optimal nutritional balance. Circulate among groups and review student work to assess understanding.


Unit 2, Lesson 15: Go–Go–Go!

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to have students practice recording their eating and exercise habits and to provide further opportunity to discuss positive and negative health behaviors. (Note: You may wish to have students work on each form simultaneously or separately. You may also wish to have students fill each log for a shorter or longer timespan.)

Show students how to use Snack Attack Log (form 2.8) and Physical Activity Log (form 2.9) by reviewing the sample day entries and noting the due date of each. Click here to access form 2.8, and click here to access form 2.9. Brainstorm various choices students might be able to make over the next several days, identifying both potential positive and negative behaviors. Allow students to report their entries verbally over the course of the logging. Once logs are returned, celebrate student successes while reinforcing the learning. Find a way to be positive with each child: many children may lack sufficient family support and may need the additional encouragement.

Additional suggestion: Repeat the traffic lights activity found in WOW! Health Education Teacher’s Guide: Yellow Level, in Unit 2, Lesson 14 steps 3 and 4 with a master list you have constructed from student Snack Attack Logs. Adapt to use this game with the entries on the Physical Activity Logs by adding in more sedentary activities, such as watching TV and playing video games.


Unit 3, Lesson 22: I Had a Bug in My Throat

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to teach students to share with a trusted adult any symptoms that may lead to illness. The parent involvement aspect of the worksheet may serve to further reinforce this learning.

Use the chart on page 49 of Ruby Explores the World of Wellness to guide students as they role-play recognizing and sharing symptoms with a trusted adult. Emphasize that telling the adult when they first notice symptoms should help minimize the discomfort they will suffer from the illness. Waiting to tell the adult may lead to more severe symptoms that last longer even with appropriate treatment.

To begin, play the role of the child, with your class playing the role of the trusted adult. Using the first entry in the chart on page 49, say, I have a runny nose. I’m sneezing and coughing, too. Ask the class to respond with the information from the 2nd and 3rd columns in the chart, for example, You might have a common cold. You might need rest and fluids.

Continue through the chart, role-playing each potential illness. Vary who plays the role of the adult (the class or yourself) and who plays the role of the child reporting symptoms (yourself or the class). Once you have reviewed the entire chart, have pairs of students role-play some or all of the examples, taking turns as to who plays which role (adult or child).

Distribute one copy of Things That Can Happen When You’re Sick (form 2.10) to each child. Click here to access form 2.10. Direct students to use the chart on page 49 to complete part 1 of the worksheet. Send the worksheets, with due date, home for students to complete part 2 with a trusted adult. Once worksheets are returned, encourage students to discuss their home practice experiences. Remind students whom they may share symptoms with at school to get help, for example, yourself, the school nurse, and other teachers.


Unit 3, Lesson 23: Germs, Germs, Germs

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help students (1) identify a vast array of sources of health information and (2) recognize the ways news media, technology and other sources provide information about health.

Explain that health information may come from many sources. State that you are going to teach them about two main types of sources: people and media. Distribute one copy of Where Do You Find Health Information? (form 2.11) to each student. Click here to access form 2.11. Identify the type of source for two or three specific sources on form 2.11 as a class. Allow students time to complete all sections on the worksheet. Check number 1 answers as a class. Share and discuss individual answers to questions 2 and 3. Outline the types of media and people sources you have used and plan to use while teaching the WOW! series this school year.

If desired, invite your school librarian to discuss how he or she can help students find many types of health information using a variety of sources and technology tools to help develop grade-appropriate library skills.

Now discuss the ways news media, technology and other sources provide information about health. For example, news stories may be in the form of print, videotape, or live coverage. Technology, such as e-mail, the Internet, CD-ROMs, and DVDs, may also provide valid health information. For example, a person might e-mail an expert with a health question or look up the answer at a trustworthy web site. Certain factual CD-ROMs may offer a wealth of health information while a DVD or videotape might show and tell about health ideas, offer role-playing scenes to think about and discuss, or offer several other ways of providing health information. A CD, an audiotape, or radio media may provide helpful information as well.

Make a chart to guide whole-class discussion that lists "Eyes", "Ears," and "Both". Using both the items listed on form 2.11 and in the previous paragraph. Help students identify whether they use their eyes, ears, or both to learn from each source of information.

After the chart is complete, ask volunteers to share which forms of media they most prefer for receiving health information and why. Point out that different people learn in different ways. Having a lot of ways to learn is helpful to most people. In addition, getting health information from "people sources" also includes using both eyes and ears--as well as the very valuable factor of human conversation and interaction.


Unit 4, Lesson 27: The Cheetah and the Antelope

After teaching this lesson, you might like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help children gain more practice in using pro-social communication skills.

Play Sounds Like a Friend or Not, using the following statements. Have students cup their hands around their ears if the statement sounds like an appropriate way to talk to others and cover their ears with their hands if it does not.

Emphasize to students that the tone of their voice needs to be kind to go along with the friendly statements. Demonstrate one positive statement said sarcastically to drive this point home.

Now brainstorm with the class additional positive and negative communication examples, recording the statements on chart paper to display. Allow students to take turns crossing out the negative statements. Tell students that you are expecting them to cross these out in their minds and usage as well. Encourage students to use the positive statements in their daily interactions in school, at home, and out in the community.

Finally, if desired, use a parachute to celebrate the positive feelings pro-social communication helps to create. Place students around a large parachute, at least one handle per student. Direct students to cheer (raise the parachute high) when you make a positive statement from the chart paper list. Have students lower the parachute to the ground and make it quiver when you say a negative statement. Use mostly positive statements and end with an especially large cheer. (As an alternative, students may act out these movements without a parachute.)


Unit 5, Lesson 29: No Way!

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help students discuss, define, and demonstrate body language.

Have students look back at the art on page 66 in Ruby Explores the World of Wellness. Explain that Ruby’s body is saying the No Way! even without words. Ask students to try to tell you how, helping them to notice how her arm and hand are making a pushing away motion and her face is turned away from the other boy. Tell students this form of communication is called body language. Have the students stand and try to convey the same body language as Ruby. (You may wish to have the students sit back down for the time being.)

Act out another term in body language for the class, e.g., happy. Ask the students to identify what your body is trying to tell them. Now ask students to stand again and use body language to show they are happy. Reinforce appropriate attempts.

Distribute one copy of Body Talk (form 2.12) to each student. Click here to access form 2.12. Direct students to complete part 1. Allow students to work in pairs, if needed. Have partners complete part 2. Allow pairs to volunteer to show the class their best body language.

Additional suggestions: Be alert for students who do not understand how to read another’s body language or facial expressions. Even a very bright and verbal student may not have a large nonverbal vocabulary (giving or receiving). Encourage these and all students to report what another’s body or face was saying when telling stories about playground, family, or community events to reinforce and expand student understanding of these important communication avenues. Repeat the form 2.12 activities, particularly part 2, as needed throughout the school year to help students learn to communicate and receive communication more effectively and accurately.


Unit 5, Lesson 31: Yuck! and Unit 5, Lesson 32: Some Things Are Not for Kids

After completing Unit 5, use these creative movement ideas to review the harmful nature of alcohol and tobacco use.

Divide the class into small groups of two to four students each. Have groups spread out over an open activity area. Work with one group to demonstrate to the class the movements of healthy lungs, then unhealthy lungs used for smoking (e.g., two students facing each other, clasping hands, moving into and away from each other smoothly and as far a possible while still holding hands [healthy lungs] and then choppily and closely [unhealthy lungs]). Direct all groups to come up with their own ideas. Circulate to assist groups in brainstorming and practicing. Allow a few minutes, then ask groups to take turns demonstrating their ideas to the rest of the class. Emphasize although it may be fun to act out unhealthy (smoking) lungs, it is not fun to have them! Repeat the activity dramatizing the following situations:

Further emphasize that although it was fun to act out both the good and bad situations, in real life, the unhealthy choices cause a lot of unnecessary misery.

Technology connection (optional): Videotape student performances and have students write narration. Help your class show the video to other classes or families during an open house.


Unit 6, Lesson 34: Only One Earth

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to (1) discuss how the community works to prevent and control disease and (2) help students identify community agencies that support healthy families, individuals, and communities. The potential family involvement aspect may further reinforce and extend health education learning and support student well-being.

Explain that neighborhood cleanups, such as Ruby participated in (pages 78-79 of the student book), are just one way that communities work together to prevent and control disease. For example, agencies, such as recycling and garbage businesses and government offices, combine their efforts to make sure communities stay clean. Define an agency as a formal group of people set up to meet a need. Ordinary people, such as Ruby, yourself, and the students can also help.

Refer back to Unit 6, Lesson 33 and Unit 3, Lesson 21 as well. Point out that each official health and community helper is usually part of one community agency or another. For example, a firefighter is part of the fire department. A nurse is part of the school or a clinic. Fire departments, schools, and clinics are all examples of community agencies. Each agency helps make sure that its workers do their jobs right and that those whose need they are trying to meet are served well. Use Communities Work Together: Helpers and Agencies (form 2.13) to help students identify additional community agencies that work to support healthy families, individuals, and communities. Click here to access form 2.13. As different locations may group community services in different ways, accept and discuss all reasonable answers and point out how your local community agencies are grouped. Explain that the art on the worksheet highlights an additional community agency—a recycling service. Tell students that this scene is on a planet where the number one rule is to take care of the planet. Even though they are young, each of your students can help the local recycling service agency by recycling.

Additional suggestions: Take the class on a field trip to visit a community agency directly working to provide health services, such as a health department, hospital, fire station, or even a veterinary clinic. Look for connections to grade-appropriate science and social studies learning to further reinforce the health education lesson.

Encourage families to volunteer at a local agency, such as a library, animal shelter, or homeless shelter. Make time for such volunteers to report their experiences to the class. Go beyond reinforcing learning about community agencies and emphasize the mental, emotional, family, and social health gains that may be made through helping others.


Unit 6, Lesson 35: Believe It or Not

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use this additional WOW! Health Activity to reinforce student learning about how commercials influence the purchase of health-related products and services.

Distribute one copy of Where Is My Show? (form 2.14) to each student. Click here to access form 2.14. Review the instructions carefully. If desired, show students one or more commercials you have recorded and help them mark the correct column. Give students three or more days to complete the assignment. Have students share their findings while reinforcing the importance of thinking clearly and making healthy choices in the face of media influences.