Supplement to WOW! Fourth Grade Materials
(Blue Level)


Unit 1, Lesson 2: The Great EscapeAlmostPersonal Hygiene Planning
Unit 1, Lesson 8: The Goliath Beetles and
Unit 1, Lesson 9: Blowing Off SteamGeneral Personal Safety

Unit 1, Lesson 9: Blowing Off Steam
Unit 2, Lesson 12: The Big Label Discovery
Unit 2, Lesson 13: Buyer Beware and
Unit 6, Lesson 33: T.J.s Sales PitchFood Advertising

Unit 2, Lesson 14: Fuel for Thought
Unit 3, Lesson 15: Its Not Like a Cold;
Unit 3, Lesson 16: What Is Asthma?; and
Unit 3, Lesson 17: An Incredible Infection

Unit 3, Lesson 17: An Incredible InfectionVaccination and Disease Record Examination
Unit 3, Lesson 18: When I Was Two (See also Unit 1, Lesson 5.)
Unit 3, Lesson 19: Body Systems
Unit 4: Mental, Emotional, Family, and Social Health
Unit 4, Lesson 20: Something Is Different and
Unit 4, Lesson 21: Sometimes Sad, Sometimes MadFocusing on Stress Management

Unit 4, Lesson 22: Making the Right Decision;
Unit 4, Lesson 24: Inspector Insector Says No!;
Unit 5, Lesson 25: Bad Side Effects; Unit 5, Lesson 26: Against the Law;
Unit 5, Lesson 27: Getting Help;
Unit 5, Lesson 28: InhalantsGood Decision-Making (See also Unit 1, Lesson 9.)

Unit 4, Lesson 23: The Family Meeting (See also Unit 4, Lessons 20, 21, and 22.)
Unit 5, Lesson 25: Bad Side Effects;
Unit 5, Lesson 26: Against the Law;
Unit 5, Lesson 27: Getting Help; and
Unit 5, Lesson 28: Inhalants

Unit 5, Lesson 25: Bad Side Effects;
Unit 5, Lesson 26: Against the Law;
Unit 5, Lesson 27: Getting Help; and
Unit 5, Lesson 28: InhalantsPersonal Safety Through ATOD Avoidance


Unit 1, Lesson 2: The Great EscapeAlmostPersonal Hygiene Planning

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to guide students in developing and practicing a personal hygiene plan.

Caution: Remember to be sensitive to family and cultural practices, such as shampooing more or less often based on hair needs and types. Maintain student privacy at all times. In addition, accept student plans with little or no judgment: What you should look for are the planning and practicing steps, not a rigid application of your own beliefs. Of course, if a student seems to lack support from home for practicing minimally acceptable and healthful hygiene practices, you have a duty to report your concern to the appropriate authorities, according to your schools guidelines.


On p. 5 of WOW! T.J.s Adventures in the World of Wellness: Student BookBlue Level review the blue sidebars Good Grooming Is Groovy Boovy! and Choosing Personal Grooming Products. In addition, on p. 39, review the the blue sidebar titled How can you avoid communicable diseases?. Remind students that good personal hygiene may greatly reduce the chances of getting or passing on a communicable disease. Brainstorm and record a list of effective hygiene practices (e.g., washing hands; drying clean skin thoroughly, including between the toes; bathing and shampooing regularly; covering your mouth or nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing).

Distribute one copy of My Personal Hygiene Plan (form 4.1) to each student. Click here to access form 4.1. Review part A as a class. Discuss. Direct students to complete part B, My Personal Hygiene Plan, individually. Ask students to self-report their practice of the plan over the coming weeks using one or more of the following suggestions:


Unit 1, Lesson 8: The Goliath Beetles and Unit 1, Lesson 9: Blowing Off SteamGeneral Personal Safety

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help students be able to explain how to recognize and avoid risky situations involving general personal safety (e.g., helmet, seatbelt, and other safety equipment use and insect repellent and sunscreen use). In addition, students will get more experience evaluating dangerous situations, considering alternatives, and identifying the consequences of various choices. (See the supplemental section for Unit 5, Lessons 25, 26, 27, 28, on Personal Safety Through ATOD Avoidance for similar activities for personal safety related to ATODs.)

Many students will have some idea as to when, what, and how to use safety equipment and other products to enhance their personal safety. Yet, it is important to review each of several potential everyday situations to ensure students can explain product uses readily and accurately. This will help you confirm that they have learned core facts necessary to protect them throughout life. Risky Situations: General Personal Safety Practice (form 4.2) gives students practice in evaluating some dangerous situations related to general personal safety (sample answers follow this section). Click here to access form 4.2. General Personal Safety Quiz (form 4.3a) will help students to reviewand you to evaluatetheir understanding. Use it not only as a quiz but also as a teaching tool. Click here to access form 4.3a. For answers to this quiz, click here to access form 4.3b.

Form 4.2 Sample Answers

Situation 1

Situation 2

Situation 3

Situation 4

Situation 5


Unit 1, Lesson 9: Blowing Off Steam

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to show students how to use technology to examine and explore risks involved in not using appropriate safety skills and equipment for recreational purpose. The classic science core activity makes a firm, age-appropriate connection between health education and science learning.

Show students a raw egg. Ask them to predict what will happen if you drop it from table height into a large box or bowl. Drop it and confirm or dispel student opinions (it should break). Now supply groups of three to six students with a variety of packing materials, such as bubble wrap, Styrofoam, cardboard, tape, and the like. Give each group a raw egg in a cup to use when theyre ready. Direct each group to design a container that will keep the egg from cracking when dropped from the same height as you dropped your egg. Mandate that the container must not be more than eight inches (20 cm) long in any direction. Once completed, allow each group to test their containers. Enjoy seeing whose egg remains uncracked while praising the hard work of all groups.

Explain that the containers the groups produced act much the same as a bike helmet or other helmet, elbow and knee pads, and sunscreen. Their containers are examples of technology as are the inventions that keep us safe when were out being physically active. A persons brain can scramble just like a broken, raw egg if it suffers a fall without the right type of helmet, worn correctly, to protect it. Ouch! Share that sometimes helmets are called brain buckets for just this reason.

Certainly, knowing and following the rules for safe participation, e.g., for bike riding, ATVs, and wearing helmets and other safety gear correctly are essential. Tell students that in the coming days (or weeks) they will be using the Internet and other technology to research the rules for these or, with your approval, other safety rules. Explain that you want them to be safe wherever they are and whatever they are doing to be physically active, both in and outside of school.

Use Brain Buckets and Safety Sense (form 4.4) to guide students through the research process, adjusting parameters as needed to fit available time, student abilities, and specific goals. Click here to access form 4.4. Set a due date and allow time for practice presentations and project improvements. Have students share their refined projects with each other and other classes.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 2, Lesson 12: The Big Label Discovery

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help students propose family menus that meet dietary guidelines. Click here to access the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and the new MyPyramid information. The potential for peer-teaching and school cafeteria involvement will help broaden student learning and application of the dietary guidelines.

Make an overhead transparency or large chart of form 4.5. Click here to access form 4.5. Ask students to report what they ate and drank at their last meal. Record several answers in each section of the menu form. Using the information in the second column (Dietary Guidelines) and fourth column ( Tips), discuss whether foods and drinks were low-fat (or lean), low sugar, low sodium, whole-grain, prepared according to recommendations, and so on.

Explain that the information on the chart comes from www.mypyramid.gov and the group of people who worked together to create it, based on their expert knowledge of health-promoting food and drink choices. If possible, visit this Web site as a class and explore the additional information found there.

Distribute three copies of form 4.5 to each student. Explain that each student will be planning three menus for their familybreakfast, lunch, and dinner. Tell them that while you are not requiring that the menus be prepared and eaten, you do expect them to follow the dietary guidelines. They will also need to complete the last section, analyzing the fat, sugar, and sodium content (e.g., low, medium, and high) of their choices. Set a due date for returning the menus.

Discuss returned menus as a class. Ask students to share what the challenges were and what they feel they excelled at. Ask them why they chose certain foods and drinks and why they did not choose others. Discuss family, cultural, and personal preferences and traditions, but avoid stereotypical comments. Assess student work by comparing it to the dietary guidelines.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 2, Lesson 13: Buyer Beware and Unit 6, Lesson 33: T.J.s Sales PitchFood Advertising

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to reinforce and extend student learning about food advertising, especially in identifying its purposes and relationship to personal health. The math and science connection made by the graphing activities helps students see how these subjects may relate to health information.

Collect or have students and parents collect a wide variety of food advertisements from magazines. Give each small group of two to four students six to ten of the ads to examine.

Tell students the following: As you have learned in WOW! T.J.s Adventures in the World of Wellness: Student BookBlue Level, advertisers use many strategies to get you to buy their products. In this activity, you will identify the strategies used in a variety of magazine advertisements for food. You will use this information to help you make healthier choices in your everyday life. You will say, Right back at ya! to the advertisers as you learn to fight the temptation to buy foods just because of the advertising.

Distribute one copy of Sales Pitches: Right Back at Ya! (form 4.6) to each student. Click here to access form 4.6. Show students an example of each type of advertisement purpose. Discuss a small selection of ads to determine if they are promoting a less healthy or a more healthy product. In addition, if needed, remind students how to use data to construct a bar graph. Direct students to complete part A as a group with their supply of ads.

Allow each group to report their results for class discussion. Collectively as a class, graph Less healthy versus More healthy. A bar graph such as the one practiced in part B of the worksheet should work well.

Now have students complete part C, relating the potential impact of the ads to personal health individually. Allow volunteers to report their thoughts to the class. Finally, refer to Unit 4, Lesson 22: Making the Right Decisions, connecting the decision-making process to the concept and practice of making good food choices.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 2, Lesson 14: Fuel for Thought

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to give students practice recording their health-promoting habits and describe which activities and foods were health-promoting decisions.

Health-Related Fitness Habits
Ask several students to share what they have done to be physically active in the last day or so. List these activities on the board or an overhead transparency without discussion. Discuss the completed list to make sure everyone agrees that each physical activity is health-promoting.

Explain that for the next four days, students will be keeping trackloggingtheir physical activities and media use (computer, TV, video games). They will be comparing the total time they spend on eachbeing active and being inactive.

Distribute one copy of Phillips Personal Fitness Log (form 4.7) to each student. Click here to access form 4.7. Ask students to predict if the time Phillip spent on physical activity will be more, the same, or less than the time he spent on media. Now direct students to calculate the grand total time Phillip spent on fitness (3 hrs., 55 min.) and the grand total time he spent on media (5 hrs, 15 min.). Discuss how these actual totals compare to student predictions. Point out that even though Phillip spent no more than 1 hour a day watching TV and movies and no more than 30 minutes a day on the computer or playing video games, the grand total quickly added up! Ask or tell, What was his average time per day spent using media?. (1 hour, 18 minutes, rounded to the nearest minute.)

Tell students that children should be physically active 30-60 minutes a day, most days. Ask, Did Phillip meet that minimum?. (Yes.) Ask or tell, What was his average time participating in physical activity per day?. (59 minutes, rounded to the nearest minute, or about one hour per day.)

Discuss the following to help students evaluate Phillips overall performance in making health-promoting decisions or not (sample answers are in parentheses):

Distribute one copy of Personal Fitness Log (form 4.8a) to each student. Click here to access form 4.8a. Review the instructions and encourage students to use Phillips completed logs to remember how to fill in the blanks, based on their personal activities. Make the due date of the logging clear, based on the start date.

Once logs are returned, have students share what physical activities they enjoyed the most. Take a quick poll to see how many students spent more time on which type of activityphysical or media.

Now distribute one copy of Thinking About My Fitness Habits (form 4.8b) to each student. Click here to access form 4.8b. Allow time for students to answer the questions, encouraging them to be honest with themselves. Ask several volunteers to share their findings. Reinforce health-promoting activity decisions.

Eating Habits
After the fitness log activity is complete, prepare students to log their eating habits. Ask several students to share what they remember eating that they believe was health-promoting in the last day or so. List these foods on the board or an overhead transparency without discussion. Discuss the completed list to make sure everyone agrees that each food or drink is health-promoting.

Distribute one copy of My Eating Log (form 4.9a) to each student. Click here to access form 4.9a. Review the instructions and set the exact start and due date (and time of day, if appropriate). Once the eating logs are returned, distribute one copy of Thinking About My Eating Habits (form 4.9b) to each student. Click here to access form 4.9b. Allow time for students to answer the questions, encouraging them to be honest with themselves. Ask several volunteers to share their findings. Reinforce health-promoting food decisions.

Additional Suggestions

Click here to access the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and the new MyPyramid information.


Unit 3, Lesson 15: Its Not Like a Cold; Unit 3, Lesson 16: What Is Asthma?; and Unit 3, Lesson 17: An Incredible Infection

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to reinforce and extend student ability to identify and prevent or manage health problems common in the school setting.

Duplicate forms 4.10ac, enough to make one set of playing cards per pair of students. Click here to access form 4.10a, click here to access form 4.10b, and click here to access form 4.10c. Mount or have students mount the cards onto slightly larger rectangles (e.g., 2 x 3 [5 cm x 8 cm]) made of heavier paper, such as tagboard, index cards, or construction paper. Have students play Concentration in pairs with the Health Problem Game Cards (form 4.10a) and the Description Game Cards (form 4.10b), following these rules:

  1. Shuffle the 20 playing cards and place them face down on a flat surface.
  2. The first player turns two cards over. If the health problems name and its description are found, this is a match, and the first player keeps the match and scores a point. The first player may then turn over two more cards until he or she does not find a match. Then it becomes the other players turn.
  3. Play continues until all matches are made.
  4. The player with the most matches wins.

After pairs have finished playing Concentration, review the information found on the cards as a class. Emphasize that students should show compassion to those who have any health problem. Teasing someone for having, for example, lice or being overweight is not acceptable (see also supplement to Unit 3, Lesson 18).

Distribute the 10 Prevention or Treatment Game Cards (form 4.10c), one set to each pair of students. Direct pairs to play Concentration again, this time with all 30 cards. Players may turn over three cards per turn and must find all three related cards to make a match.

After pairs have finished playing this round of Concentration, review the information found on the new cards as a class. Emphasize that these common health problems are preventable or controllable. Remind students, however, to show compassion to people who suffer from any of these problems.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 3, Lesson 17: An Incredible InfectionVaccination and Disease Record Examination

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to have students examine their personal vaccination and disease record. The parent involvement option (form 4.12) should also serve to encourage parent attention to this important part of child health.

Caution: Be sure to know and follow school and district protocols for protection of student privacy.

Begin by discussing vaccines as a class.

Tell students that vaccines are given on a schedule from early infancy throughout life. It is important to make sure you have all your vaccines up to date. If a person is behind, they should work with their doctor to catch up.

Explain that today students will be looking at sample vaccine and disease records to learn a bit about reading their own records. Make an overhead transparency of Sharla Shot and Her Vaccination and Disease Record (form 4.11) and distribute a photocopy of the worksheet to each student. Complete the worksheet as a class as you discuss the highlights of Sharla Shots records. Click here to access form 4.11.

Now distribute one copy of Investigate Your Own Vaccination and Disease Record (form 4.12) to each student. Click here to access form 4.12. Assign a due date, approximately one week from now. Have partners practice asking each other the interview questions.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 3, Lesson 18: When I Was Two (See also Unit 1, Lesson 5.)

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help students explain why healthy human bodies can be various shapes and sizes. The connections to acceptance of self and others may enhance your classroom atmosphere.

Review the definition of prejudice found in the Accepting Others sidebar on page 11 of WOW! T.J.s Adventures in the World of Wellness: Student BookBlue Level. Then review the Respecting Differences sidebar on the same page. Connect these concepts and guidelines to the idea that people can do different things at different ages, as outlined on pages 40-41. Tell students that no one should be made fun of because of their age or size or abilities.

Now make the connection to the fact that healthy human bodies may come in all shapes and sizes, even if the age and abilities of the people compared are the same. For example, some people are thin, and some people are heavier. People have larger or smaller noses, feet, or stomachs. The list could go on and on about how we are each special and uniquephysically, emotionally, intellectually, and so on.

Tell students, for example, that someone who may be overweight may still have a healthy heart, while someone thin may not. Getting plenty of aerobic activity is the key to heart healthnot body fat or body weight. A shorter person may play basketball better than a taller personyou just never know! It is important to treat everyone with respect and acceptance no matter their shape or size.

Divide students into pairs. Ask each student to secretly write down one nice thing about their partner. Encourage students to focus on nonphysical traits, such as thoughtfulness, sense of humor, or creativity. Have partners quietly share what they wrote about each other.

Finally, have the class walk, bent over at the waist, around the room high-five-ing each other. Ask, How does this feel?. (Sample answers: Uncomfortable; makes it hard to give the high-fives.) Explain that showing prejudice and disrespect for differences to others is like making someone walk bent over or tying a large weight around the persons ankle. It slows or weighs them down with hurt and bad feelings about themselves and others.

Now have the class walk upright around the room high-five-ing each other. Ask, How does this feel now?. (Sample answers: Much better; more fun.) Explain that this activity helps promote good feelings about not only each other but also about ourselves. This is the class atmosphere you want to continue to encourage and promote so that everyone is free to do their best, that is, not walking bent over emotionally or carrying around the unnecessary weight of bad feelings and hurt.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 3, Lesson 19: Body Systems

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help students describe the major parts of the muscular and skeletal systems of the human body. The physically active nature of some of the options may also serve as a way to incorporate more bodily kinesthetic and physical activity opportunities into your teaching. In addition, the peer-teaching options may help increase student understanding of how to communicate and advocate for health concepts. Finally, this lesson and this supplemental material makes connections to the elementary science curriculum.

Review the instructions on form 4.14 and form 4.15. Set a due date for each. Click here to access form 4.14 and click here to access form 4.15.

Options


Unit 4: Mental, Emotional, Family, and Social Health

After teaching this unit, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to reinforce and extend student understanding of how to communicate more effectively; demonstrating skills necessary for relating how one feels; making, being, and keeping friends; and practicing assertiveness, conflict resolution, and refusal skills.

Have students turn to page 10 of WOW! T.J.s Adventures in the World of Wellness: Student BookBlue Level. Review the steps of the WOW! Solution found in the blue sidebar. Help the class rewrite the steps, beginning each part with I. Write the new I messages on the board or an overhead transparency. For example,

Continue by explaining that it is often okay to say what you are thinking and feeling. What might not be okayor effectiveis how you say it. Even the best of friends have conflicts sometimes, such as arguments. Of course, family members do! Then there are foespeople who try to get you to do something wrong. Write the following question and messages on the board or an overhead transparency. Help students identify the more effective ways to answer versus the less effective ways. Challenge them to rewrite the less effective messages to begin with I. Sample answers are provided in parentheses.

    How are you feeling today?
    Today is so bad. (I feel badly today because my dog is sick.)
    This assignment stinks. (I am frustrated because I forgot my homework.)
    My sister drives me crazy! (I am feeling frustrated because my sister goes into my room when Im not home.)

Tell your students, We are going practice a new communication skillmaking I messagesto

Distribute one copy of I Can Get an A+ Communicating With the Three Fs: Friends, Family, and Foes (form 4.17) to each student. Click here to access form 4.17. Review and discuss the sample answers provided in part A. Point out how starting with I helps a person get off to a good start in communicating their needs, thoughts, and feelings.

Direct students to complete the rest of the worksheet. Discuss potential answers to each section. Reinforce that is it not rude or aggressive to begin with a firm No for messages 2 and 7 because it is obvious that someone is trying to get another person to do something wrong. But following it with an assertive I message should be a more effective refusal skill than calling someone a name. Refer students to the sidebar titled Refusal Skills (page 56 of WOW! T.J.s Adventures in the World of Wellness: Student BookBlue Level). Practice what they could say for the third bulleted point (say why not) using an I message. (Sample answers: I have to be home by dark; I do not want to put that in my healthy body!)

Additional Suggestions


Unit 4, Lesson 20: Something Is Different and Unit 4, Lesson 21: Sometimes Sad, Sometimes MadFocusing on Stress Management

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to help students learn how to manage stress more effectively.

Make a poster or other large-group display listing the sample stress relievers listed under step 2 in lesson 21 of Lead Em Through Language Arts in your teachers guide. Also refer students back to pages 10-15 in WOW! T.J.s Adventures in the World of Wellness: Student BookBlue Level, reinforcing the connections among conflict resolution, physical activity, and stress management.

Explain that today, students are going to focus on just one source of negative stress (a stressor) in their lives and make a plan for managing this stress. After one week, you will ask them to evaluate how their plan is working and make any necessary adjustments to create the most effective plan possible. Review the instructions on My Stress Management Action Plan (form 4.18). Click here to access form 4.18. Set the exact due date in step 4 for the worksheet, including the plan evaluation required in step 5.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 4, Lesson 22: Making the Right Decision; Unit 4, Lesson 24: Inspector Insector Says No!; Unit 5, Lesson 25: Bad Side Effects; Unit 5, Lesson 26: Against the Law; Unit 5, Lesson 27: Getting Help; Unit 5, Lesson 28: InhalantsGood Decision-Making (See also Unit 1, Lesson 9.)

After teaching Unit 4, Lesson 22 or any of the Unit 5 lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to further help students define risk-taking behaviors and anticipate present (immediate) and future consequences of potentially taking such risks.

Use student scripts produced in Unit 4, Lesson 22 to generate a list of risk-taking situations, including, for example, not using protective equipment (review Unit 1, Lesson 9), being tempted by alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATODs), and not using sunscreen or insect repellent. Select exemplary scriptsthose that best represent the steps to making a good decision (see Making a Good Decision sidebar on p. 51 in WOW! T.J.s Adventures in the World of Wellness: Student BookBlue Level) for all students to act out in small groups. Discuss each script as a class, highlighting the decision-making steps.

Point out that when we think ahead and look at all the different outcomes that are possible (step 2) and at how something might affect our families and friends (step 3), we are considering the immediate (or present) and future consequences. This process is vital in helping us avoid unnecessary risks.

To reinforce the learning and evaluate individual understanding, complete the first column of Risky Situations: Consequences (form 4.19) using class script examples and duplicate. Distribute one copy of form 4.19 to each student. Click here to access form 4.19. Review the instructions then direct students to complete the worksheet on their own. Reteach and reinforce decision-making concepts as needed to promote this essential life skill.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 4, Lesson 23: The Family Meeting (See also Unit 4, Lessons 20, 21, and 22.)

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to have student list TV programs that exemplify family relationships and explain their selections.

Brainstorm and record a list of popular TV shows that include family relationships and family life situations with students. Choose one show from the list with which you are familiar. With this show in mind, lead a class discussion, exploring how it does and does not model positive family relationships and responses to life situations. Ask the questions in part B of The Family Hour (form 4.20) and discuss the answers (sample answers are provided in parentheses below). Click here to access form 4.20.

  1. Do any of the fictional family members model good listening skills (or not)? Give an example. (None of them use good listening skills. Theyre always shouting at each other and leaving the house when theyre mad. Or, Yes, the parents try hard to use good listening skills by looking at each other when they talk and asking questions if they dont understand each other.)
  2. Do the family members model positive ways to support each other during difficult times (or not) (refer students to Unit 4, Lessons 20, 21, and 23)? Give an example. (Yes, when the father had to go into the hospital, the kids quit arguing, did their homework without being told, and worked hard to clean the house to help everyone out.)
  3. How would you change this show to do a better job of modeling positive family relationships? Why? (I would have them face more serious problems together so that they had to learn to work together better; I would have their mom and dad call a family meeting to practice listening skills.)

Distribute one copy of form 4.20 to each student. Assign the due date (one week to 10 days is recommended). Once the worksheets are returned, allow students to report their findings and ideas. Encourage students to select shows that model positive family relationships and responses to family life situations. Finally, remind students that they should limit even positive TV show watching each day, leaving plenty of time for physical activity.

Additional Suggestions


Unit 5, Lesson 25: Bad Side Effects; Unit 5, Lesson 26: Against the Law; Unit 5, Lesson 27: Getting Help; and Unit 5, Lesson 28: Inhalants

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to further help prevent alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse. Specifically, students should be able to

These learning activities also reinforce Unit 4 concepts.

Explain to students that scientists work very hard for many years to develop effective medicines to help reduce the symptoms or even cure an illness or disease. Today students are going to develop their own medicines. Distribute one copy of Miracle Medicine (form 4.21) to each student, pair of students, or small group of three to five students. Click here to access form 4.21. Review the steps of the invention and product promotion process. Redistribute the sets of Concentration cards created as a supplement to Unit 3, Lessons 15, 16, and 17 (forms 4.10ac) to give students ideas as to what health problem they might like to cure. Allow approximately 15 minutes for students to complete steps 1, 2, and 3 and another 15 or more minutes for students to complete step 4. Complete step 5 and discuss student ideas as time allows in this and future class sessions.

Discussion Points

Additional Suggestions


Unit 5, Lesson 25: Bad Side Effects; Unit 5, Lesson 26: Against the Law; Unit 5, Lesson 27: Getting Help; and Unit 5, Lesson 28: InhalantsPersonal Safety Through ATOD Avoidance

After completing Unit 5, use Risky Situations: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use Prevention (form 4.22) to help students apply personal safety principles (Unit 1) to the challenging arena of preventing alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse. Click here to access form 4.22. Students will practice recognizing and avoiding potentially risky situations and making health-promoting decisions when pressures do arise. After completing form 4.22, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs Safety Quiz (form 4.23a) offers a quiz to check student understanding. Use it as both a teaching tool and an assessment to determine what students have learned and what you need to continue reviewing. Click here to access form 4.23a. For answers to this quiz, click here to access form 4.23b.

Begin by having the children play No Way or Okay! Tag in a large, open space. Use the information found in the Unit 5 materials and on the quiz found on form 4.23a to create questions that may be answered with no way or okay. Instructions are as follows (optional: a way to amplify your voice or an audible signal, such as a whistle):

  1. Explain: You will keep moving in the way I direct (walking, running, skipping, etc.). I will read a question. If the correct answer is No way!, you (including taggers) should keep moving. In this case, taggers may tag other students. This stands for doing the wrong thing and having to use energy to deal with the consequences. If the correct answer is Okay! you should freeze. Taggers may not tag anyone who has frozen themselves. Tagged students will also become taggers.
  2. Select three or four taggers.
  3. As needed, amplify your voice while students continue to move or use an audible signal to tell students to freeze and listen to each new question.
  4. Restart the game with new taggers periodically.

Ask students what part of their bodies the exercise was good for. (Heart, lungs, leg muscles.) Reinforce that alcohol, tobacco, and many other harmful substances are harmful to the heart. Smoking can harm the lungs as well. There are many other bad consequences (have students list several). Ask students what the positive consequences of physical activity may be. (Stronger hearts, lungs, legs, and so on; feeling good about yourself.)

Distribute one copy of form 4.22 to each student. Complete the first situation as a class. Instruct students to evaluate the rest of the situations as an individual, with a partner, or in a small group. Sample answers can be found at the end of this lesson.

Discuss completed evaluations as a class. Emphasize and reinforce effective and creative alternatives to giving in and using harmful substances. Strongly encourage students to always work for positiverather than negativeconsequences when avoiding risky situations.

Finally, point out how a person who says No way! is setting a good example for the person tempting them to do wrong. In this way, they are being excellent advocates for health-promoting choices.

Give the quiz found form 4.23a to assess student understanding and guide future teaching plans. Review quiz answers (see form 4.23b) as a class to continue reinforcing these important concepts and abilities.

Additional Suggestions

Form 4.22: Sample Answers

Situation 1

Situation 2

Situation 3

Situation 4

Situation 5