Supplement to WOW! Fifth Grade Materials
(Purple Level)


Unit 2, Lesson 8: “What Do You Eat?”
Additional Lessons for Optional Materials
UNIT 1, Lesson 4 & Unit 1, Lesson 5: “Weather, Tornadoes, and the Zoo” & “Buckets of Blood”
Unit 5, Lesson 26: “Staying Healthy Is a Great Reason to Say No”
Unit 5 and Unit 6, Lessons 30 and 31

Unit 2, Lesson 8: "What Do You Eat?"

While teaching this lesson, you might wish to use the new worksheet provided here in place of form 2.2 found in WOW! Health Education Teacher’s Guide: Purple Level, which incorporates MyPyramid (the latest food guide pyramid), especially regarding recommended daily intake of each food group and serving sizes. Then, with the Internet link provided at the end of this extension, implement the logging and goal-setting components to help students apply what they are learning in real life. (Note: To replace form 2.1 found in WOW! Health Education Teacher’s Guide: Purple Level, you will need to provide a large color copy of MyPyramid for the class and one small color copy per student. You may access the advanced kids version of this food guide at
http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/Resources/mpk_poster2.pdf.)

Duplicate and distribute the advanced kids’ version of MyPyramid, one per student. As a class, read and discuss each section of the diagram. Direct students to use the diagram to complete supplemental form 5.1. Click here to access form 5.1.

Discuss and check student answers for accuracy against the information provided on MyPyramid and form 5.1. Emphasize the need to control portion sizes and to balance eating with adequate physical activity (as represented by the staircase of left of MyPyramid).

To encourage more healthful eating, have students complete the logging and goal-setting activities on the MyPyramid Worksheet found at this link: http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/Resources/mpk_worksheet.pdf.


Optional Materials Tab (Puberty Lessons and Booklets)

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to reinforce and extend student understanding of how to identify people in the school or community who could provide valid health information about the changes that occur during puberty. See also Unit 6, Lesson 30, regarding advertising a new community health center.

Important note: This information may or may not be appropriate for your students and school setting. Always follow district and school guidelines for the teaching of health information.

Develop a written list of people and entities in the school and community who could provide valid puberty information to students with or without contact information. Obtain approval from your school administration for the list and for sharing it with students. Some resources may be, for example, parents, the school nurse, the child’s doctor, the community health center, or specific approved websites.

Upon administrative approval of the list, share and discuss the list with students. Highlight any contact information and the pros and cons of using each person as a resource (e.g., parents may or may not be easier to talk with, nurses or doctors may be the more knowledgeable). Also discuss who may most likely be the least reliable and knowledgeable to obtain information from (e.g., peers, siblings, TV drama shows, unapproved websites).

Send a copy of the list home with each student for parent or guardian signature. Return signed lists to students for their “files.” If possible and approved by your administration, have one or more representatives of these resources visit your class to describe the information they may be able to provide and how to obtain it.

Provide a verbal or written quiz to assess student knowledge and understanding of local resources for valid puberty information.


Unit 1, Lesson 4 & Unit 1, Lesson 5: “Weather, Tornadoes, and the Zoo” & “Buckets of Blood”

After teaching these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to teach students how to access information on the nature of fire, how fires start, fire’s destructiveness and how fires can be prevented, and how to reduce the risk of injuries in case of fire; includes fireworks safety. Use the role-playing conflict resolution (refusal) skills regarding fire-starting with decision-making practice to give students real-world application practice. Include the fire safety plan ideas to involve families.

Fire Prevention and Response Research Ideas

  1. Have small groups each research and report one of these fire topics at your school library, the local public library, and through the Internet: the nature of fire, how fires start, fire’s destructiveness and how fires can be prevented, how to reduce the risk of injuries in case of fire, and how fireworks may lead to fire and injuries. On the Internet, have students use the topic terms as search terms (e.g., "how fires can be prevented") or state them more simply (e.g., "preventing fires"). Report forms may be formal or informal as you desire.
  2. Arrange for students as a class to interview a fire safety officer from your local fire district. Ahead of time, have students prepare questions to ask about the fire topics. Ask the officer to give brief feedback on the reports small groups prepared. Then have small groups revise their reports and share them with peers in your class and other classes.
  3. Have small groups each role-play or write and give a skit demonstrating fire prevention tactics, appropriate responses to fire, or potential injuries created by fire and fireworks.

Fire Prevention Practice Ideas: Applying Refusal and Decision-Making Skills

  1. Review the conflict resolution skills explored in Unit 1, Lesson 2 and the violence prevention advice discussed in Unit 1, Lesson 3.
  2. Referring to the role-playing situations offered on form 1.3 (Unit 1, Lesson 2 in the Teacher’s Guide—Purple Level), have small groups of students each write a role-playing scenario in which one or more peers are tempted to start a fire or misuse fireworks (e.g., by someone else, by circumstances, by anger). Direct small groups to swap role-playing scenarios and act out how they would use the WOW! Conflict Resolution Model to refuse to start a fire or misuse fireworks.

Fire Safety Plan Ideas


Unit 5, Lesson 26: "Staying Healthy Is a Great Reason to Say No"

After teaching this lesson, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to reinforce and extend student understanding of your school policies and local community laws related to alcohol, tobacco and other drug use, possession, and sales.

Give your students a verbal or written quiz to assess their knowledge regarding school rules for alcohol and tobacco use. Note verbal, or collect and score any written, results. Provide to students and read and discuss your school policies regarding alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use, possession, and sales aloud with your students. Be sure to discuss both school and health consequences of violating the policies. (If no written policy is available, ask an administrator, school social worker, or other appropriate colleague to speak with your class regarding school expectations.)

As a class, investigate your local community (town or city) laws regarding alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use, possession, and sales. You may wish to use one or all of the following resources: the Internet, the local public library, or a visit from a local police officer. Be sure to discuss both the legal and health consequences of violating the laws. Emphasize laws and consequences that apply to juveniles, but also include those that apply to adults.

Direct and guide students to take notes during the school policies and community laws discussions. Have students store these notes to refer to during the next extension lesson.


Unit 5 and Unit 6, Lessons 30 and 31

After teaching all these lessons, you might also like to use these additional WOW! Health Activities to reinforce and extend student understanding of the school rules regarding alcohol and tobacco use through creating and running a positive media campaign, to convince peers to follow those school rules.

Guide students through a review of the notes they took during the previous extension lesson. Brainstorm potential ways students might encourage school peers to follow school policies regarding alcohol and tobacco use. The following are some potential projects for students to share with elementary peers:

Once students have shared ideas freely, guide the class through the pros and cons of each suggestion. Eliminate ideas that would be too difficult to implement in your situation. Select as the teacher or have students vote about which idea(s) they would like to implement. Set a due date and set aside class time to complete the project(s). Facilitate students’ delivering their media campaign. Finally, at the end of the media campaign, retest your students’ knowledge regarding alcohol and tobacco use through a verbal or written quiz. Note increases in knowledge and reinforce the value of the media campaign to all your school’s students.