Supplement to WOW! Kindergarten Materials
(Red Level)


Unit 2, Lesson 13: A Crunch for Lunch
Unit 2, Lesson 14: Tacos by Cody
Unit 3, Lesson 18: Busy Body
Unit 3, Lesson 21: Being Sick Is Boring
Unit 4, Lesson 28: Who Is Your Listening Friend?
Unit 5, Lesson 29: No Way!
Unit 5, Lesson 30: Look-Alikes
Unit 6, Lesson 33: Taking Care of Each Other

Unit 2, Lesson 13: A Crunch for Lunch

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to introduce children to setting and reaching a goal of eating a healthy snack each day. The parent involvement element will help reinforce the learning of this important life skill.

Discuss the importance of setting goals to help make healthier food choices. Explain that you have a form (form K.1) that will help students practice setting and reaching healthy snacking goals. Click here to access form K.1. Duplicate (with due date inserted, about one week from date of this lesson) and distribute one copy to each student. Review the form with students. Send the form home to be completed, signed, and returned by the due date. Share a healthy snack as a class to reinforce the learning.

Unit 2, Lesson 14: Tacos by Cody

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to discuss favorite foods and the origins of foods. The parent involvement aspect will help reinforce the learning and validate and celebrate differences among people in your community.

Discuss how each family has their own favorite foods based on their experiences, likes and dislikes, culture, and other reasons. Explain that the foods we have available to us in our local stores and restaurants came originally from many different places around the world. Ask your school librarian to help you locate appropriate books that show these truths. For example, Salsa Stories by Lulu Delacre (Scholastic Press) takes students on a tour of countries’ Hispanic culture. Food (Discovering World Cultures) by Fiona MacDonald explores traditional food, recipes, and feasts from around the world. Draw upon these and other titles for additional teaching ideas.

Beware of stereotyping, however; people may eat similar foods despite dissimilar backgrounds and traditions while many may not like the foods they were raised with. What we like to eat is special to each of us.

Invite parents and guardians to visit and share their favorite food traditions with students. Or collect family recipes students bring into school and create a simple class cookbook that students may illustrate. Use the sample handout A World of Foods (form K.2) to encourage community involvement. Click here to access form K.2. Finally, take the opportunity to point out food origin locations on a world map or globe. The quick connections will help introduce students to some basic world geography.


Unit 3, Lesson 18: Busy Body

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to introduce children to the setting of a goal to exercise daily with adult guidance. Indeed, the parent involvement aspect will not only help keep your students safe, it will also reinforce the learning of this important life skill.

Discuss the importance of setting goals to help make healthier activity choices. Explain that you have a form (form K.3) that will help students practice setting healthy activity goals. Click here to access form K.3. Duplicate (with due date inserted, about one week from date of this lesson) and distribute one copy to each student. Review the form with students. Send the form home to be completed, signed, and returned by the due date. Do a healthy physical activity, such as an inclusive game, as a class to reinforce the learning.


Unit 3, Lesson 21: Being Sick Is Boring

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do this additional WOW! Health Activity to help children identify the various tools a doctor uses in a checkup. This will help make the checkup process a bit less intimidating for your students.

Use A Doctor’s Tools Are Cool! (form K.4) to discuss the tools a doctor might use during a checkup. Click here to access form K.4. Ask for a show of hands of those students who recognize each tool from their last checkup. If desired, allow students to color the pictures during the discussion. Direct students to cut out the tools and paste them inside a doctor’s bag made out of a 9 x 12 piece of black construction paper folded in half to make a 9 x 6 bag. Once the bags are full, ask partners to peer teach each other about what is in them and why. Monitor these discussions for understanding and correct any remaining misperceptions by reviewing the items in your wrap-up.


Unit 4, Lesson 28: Who Is Your Listening Friend?

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to encourage students to demonstrate respect for others’ bodies and personal space.

Review the picture of Ruby and her classmates in the big book. Ask students to point out the students who are staying in their personal space and respecting other’s bodies (Ruby, boy in wheelchair, Neka). Now ask students to point out a student who is not staying in his or her own personal space (blond girl on far right is not by talking out of turn; boy, middle left, is poking another boy) and who is not respecting another’s body (boy, middle left, is poking another boy). Explain that people can be sitting or standing close to one another without bothering each other. But hands, feet, and unkind words should always be kept to yourself.

Have the class sit in a large circle so that everyone can see everyone else. Pair students off and have each pair demonstrate one way to be near each other that does not show respect for personal space and another’s body. Caution students to just pretend—no one should get hurt. Discuss examples. Now ask partners to demonstrate one way that does show respect. Discuss and reinforce these examples.

To assess understanding further, give each student a copy of My Space, Your Space (form K.5). Click here to access form K.5. Direct the students to draw an X on the picture that shows someone not respecting another’s personal space and body (boys on bikes—front right boy is harassing the other boy in foreground). Now direct students to circle the picture that shows children being respectful of each other’s personal space and bodies (boy and girl acting something out).


Unit 5, Lesson 29: No Way!

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to help children identify sources of help in school and the larger community who can help when exposed to dangerous substances.

Brainstorm and write a list of sources of helpers in school and in the community who can help with the role-playing activity. Help the children think of each source listed on Get Help! (form K.6). Click here to access form K.6. Explain to the children that knowing whom to ask for help when exposed to a potentially dangerous substance can help keep them safer.

Distribute Get Help! and tell or remind the children what the symbol at the top stands for (poison). Explain that poison is just one type of danger or dangerous substance they might come across. Many people are available to help them if they think they are in danger in any way.

Have the children point to each helper as you review the brainstormed list. Assess individual understanding by having the children mark two of the pictures on the form, e.g., circling the EMT and drawing a box around the crossing guard.


Unit 5, Lesson 30: Look-Alikes

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to help your students identify safe and unsafe household products.

Explain to students that there are many household products that are safe and, unfortunately, many that are unsafe. Ask the children to share healthy and safe products they might have in their homes, e.g., toothpaste, shampoo, baby wipes, vinegar, soaps. Explain that many of these items may be harmful, however, if too much is swallowed. A person needs to use them the way they were intended.

In addition, there are many harmful household products that children should leave alone completely. Ask the children to brainstorm a list of such products, e.g., bug killer, drain cleaner, weed killer. Record their ideas and discuss the dangers of each.

To assess understanding, distribute one copy of Safe or Unsafe? (form K.7) to each student. Click here to access form K.7. Name each type of household product aloud. Ask the students to draw a smiley face next to safer items and a frowny face next to unsafe items. Reinforce that some products, e.g., bar of soap or salt, are safe as long as they are used correctly.

Finally, remind students what the symbol for poison looks like (see form K.6, Get Help!). Reinforce that they should never touch, breathe, or swallow any product that has that symbol on its container.


Unit 6, Lesson 33: Taking Care of Each Other

When teaching this lesson, you might also like to do these additional WOW! Health Activities to familiarize students with health care resource persons.

Explain that there are many health care resource persons in your community. Say, Some of them have been mentioned in our WOW! Health Education Big Book. Can you remember who they are? (Doctor, eye doctor, nurse, dentist.)

Say, There are also two more I’d like to discuss with you today: the health department and the health teacher. A health department is a center where people can go to get medical care such as checkups and shots from health department workers. They also make sure that certain places in our community are clean and healthy, such as restaurants, grocery stores, and swimming pools. This helps prevent illnesses and diseases from spreading from person to person.

A health teacher can be anyone who teaches you about healthy living. I am a health teacher. [Name] is our school’s official health teacher. [He/she] has special training in how to teach the things we need to know to grow healthy and strong.

Distribute one copy of We Care (form K.8) to each student. Click here to access form K.8. Ask students to cross out the two pictures that do not show a health care provider. Read the words on the form aloud to assist the process. Now ask students to circle the health department worker picture and the health teacher picture. Review student work to check for understanding.